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Sunday, October 08, 2017

Robert Sheppard: Edge Poetics Keynote: a performative encircling of the particulars of poetics

3. I have realised now that these blogposts are my keynote. That my method to get me going, the equivalent of the Creative Writing technique of ‘free writing’, is actually partly the content of my talk, that my keynote is about the process of assembling a keynote. This leads to two thoughts: one, that I have not actually a lot to add to what I have already written about poetics, but that it doesn’t do any harm to repeat myself, and, two, that I have also never said much, because I have never thought much, about the development of the teaching of innovative writing before. So, in the case of poetics, I might as well do, metaphorically, what the blogposts themselves do, which is to link with other posts which have dealt with the subject before. And in terms of the second question, about why we teach innovative modes of writing, rather than how we teach them (interesting questions, true, but essentially a list of things to do in the classroom; remember: I’ve retired from teaching), that question why must also bring us back to poetics, that is, the poetics of the practices of the writing I want to constellate for convenience around the inadequate word, innovative.

So in terms of the first question here are some of the previous writings that I collage to create a performative encircling of the particulars of poetics. But only some...

 The Necessity of Poetics was a text produced over some years, in different editions from Ship of Fools, but it is serialised, in one version, here:

http://robertsheppard.blogspot.co.uk/2016/04/robert-sheppard-necessity-of-poetics-1.html

And my Inaugural Lecture here, continues it:


As does my more recent set of definitions, in my piece on Maggie O’Sullivan in When Bad Times Made for Good Poetry. There’s also my piece on the poetics of Pierre Joris and Adrian Clarke which appears here:



And in my thinking for the Introduction to Atlantic Drift here: